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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Short-period propagation of infrasonic waves from nuclear explosions / W.C. Meecham. found in the catalog.

Short-period propagation of infrasonic waves from nuclear explosions / W.C. Meecham.

W. C. Meecham

Short-period propagation of infrasonic waves from nuclear explosions / W.C. Meecham.

by W. C. Meecham

  • 307 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Infrasonic waves.,
  • Nuclear weapons -- Testing -- Detection.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 22.

    SeriesMemorandum -- RM-5103-ARPA, Research memorandum (Rand Corporation) -- RM-5103-ARPA..
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 22 p. :
    Number of Pages22
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17985167M

    The possible burn out in towns and cities could be as large as square kilometres for a 1 megaton explosion. Heat and Blast. Small or large, all nuclear blasts create fireballs with temperatures exceeding , degrees celsius. These fireballs act as shock waves that blow down everything in their path for many kilometres around.   Nuclear Weapon Blast Effects. As pictures of Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and of the test structures erected at the Nevada Test Site in the 's amply demonstrate, the blast and shock waves .

    Note: this data can be downloaded as . Solution. To access solutions, please obtain an access code from Cambridge University Press at the Lecturer Resources page for my book (registration required) and then sign up to providing this er Resources page for my book (registration required) and then sign up to. Locating nuclear explosions at the Chinese test site near Lop Nor. Science & Global Security, – Gutenberg, B. Amplitudes of surface waves and magnitudes of shallow earthquakes.

    Nuclear weapon - Nuclear weapon - The effects of nuclear weapons: Nuclear weapons are fundamentally different from conventional weapons because of the vast amounts of explosive energy they can release and the kinds of effects they produce, such as high temperatures and radiation. The prompt effects of a nuclear explosion and fallout are well known through data gathered from the attacks on. Infrasound sometimes results naturally from 'severe weather', lee waves, avalanches, earthquakes, volcanoes, bolides, waterfalls, calving of icebergs, aurora, lightning and upper-atmospheric.


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Short-period propagation of infrasonic waves from nuclear explosions / W.C. Meecham by W. C. Meecham Download PDF EPUB FB2

A possible explanation is given for the great time duration of intermediate-period (about one minute) and short-period (less than one minute) acousticgravity waves received from nuclear explosions.

It is suggested that the signal delay for intermediate periods may be due to refraction from large-scale weather fronts, and that the signal delay. for the Advanced Research Projects Agency. It discusses infrasonic waves with periods of less than a minute, as generated by nuclear explosions.

The Memorandum should be of interest to those involved in applied aspects of nuclear test detection, as well as to those interested in research on general characteristics of infrasonic waves. Short-period propagation of infrasonic waves from nuclear explosions Simplified normal mode treatment of long-period acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere About RAND Reports.

1 Generation and Propagation of Infrasonic Airwaves from Volcanic Explosions submitted to JVGR October, in conjunction with companion article J.B. Johnson*a (email - [email protected], fax - () ) *corresponding author aGeophysics Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA Keywords explosion earthquakes, volcanic infrasound.

The earlier work treated the generation and propagation of both long period ( minutes) and short period ( seconds) acoustic signals from nuclear detonations. For the U. explosions, revised locations and origin times based on a limited number of P-wave observations were used to determine group velocities.

Using records from Hong Kong and Honolulu for two U. tests, one at Eniwetok and one at Bikini, oceanic phase velocities in the period range of 15 to 40 seconds were measured for the path. Nuclear explosions are generally classified as air bursts, surface bursts, subsurface bursts, or high altitude bursts.

Air Bursts. An air burst is an explosion in which a weapon is detonated in air at an altitude below 30 km but at sufficient height that the fireball does not contact the surface of the earth. plant explosion in Germany in ) briefly attracted interest in infrasound and gravity waves.

Although infrasound was routinely monitored during World War I to locate enemy aircraft, the. nuclear test favors the generation of compressional waves.

In contrast to this, the explosion seismogram at TLY is very rich in the deviatoric component resulting in a much larger Lg arrival.

The earthquake records, in some respects, show a similar behavior to that of the nuclear test. There is a shear wave bias toward station TLY. Infrasonics, vibrational or stress waves in elastic media, having a frequency below those of sound waves that can be detected by the human ear—i.e., below 20 hertz.

The range of frequencies extends down to geologic vibrations that complete one cycle in seconds or longer. In nature such waves.

Infrasonic waves propagate at long range through atmospheric ducts resulting from the stratification of atmospheric properties. These ducts are characterized by their spatio-temporal variability. Hence, infrasonic waves integrate information upon the atmosphere along their propagation paths.

In order to study infrasonic wave propagation, we resort to atmospheric specification combining. Infrasonic waves are sub-audible acoustic waves which typically lie below the human hearing threshold (usually between to 10 Hz, sometimes going up to 20Hz).While these waves cannot be “heard” by humans, propagation, and reduced efficacy of many structures (dwellings, walls, and hearing protection) in attenuating.

Meecham WC () Effects of atmospheric wind structure on shorter-period nuclear-generated infrasound, J Geophys Res – CrossRef Google Scholar Midgley JE, Liemohn HB () Gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere.

1 Introduction. Infrasound signals result from low‐frequency acoustic waves with a frequency content below 20 Hz. These waves, because of their relatively low attenuation, can be observed at distances up to 10, km or more [Campus and Christie, ].They are generated by a variety of natural (meteors, auroras, lightning, tornadoes, ocean waves, earthquakes, avalanches, tsunamis, and.

short-period waves, the Memorandum is perhaps the first serious examina-tion of the prohlem in this context. This study should be of use in rzvealiiig more effective inethods of date treatment to better evaluate the infrasonic method of detecting nuclear explosions.

At a fraction of a second after a nuclear explosion, a high-pressure wave develops and moves outward from the fireball. This is the shock wave or blast wave, mentioned in § and to be considered subsequently in more detail, which is the cause of much destruction accompanying an air burst.

The front of the blast wave, i.e., the shock. of the effects of the pressure wave following the explosion of a gaseous charge in free space equates the deflagration propagation to a piston.

In the case of an explosion in an obstructed medium, the deflagration is considered to consist of a basic set of explosions involved in the generation of an intense blast wave. THE heavy nuclear explosion on Octoat G.M.T.

at a distance of 1, km. in Novaya Zemlya (presumably at tropospheric heights) was recorded at Sodankylä by means of a. A nuclear explosion is an explosion that occurs as a result of the rapid release of energy from a high-speed nuclear driving reaction may be nuclear fission or nuclear fusion or a multi-stage cascading combination of the two, though to date all fusion-based weapons have used a fission device to initiate fusion, and a pure fusion weapon remains a hypothetical device.

Various shock waves from nuclear blasts. Nuclear Test Film Highlights - Restored Footage, New Films, Epic Explosions - Duration: What You Haven't Seenviews. A nuclear blast releases massive amounts of energy, which dissipate as a fireball, blast forces/waves, prompt radiation, light and heat (thermal energy), and delayed ionizing radiation (i.e.

fallout: nuclear fragments created in the fission process which turn into radioactive elements which attach to vaporized debris particles from the explosion).A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms Fernando Simões1, Robert Pfaff1, Jean-Jacques Berthelier2, Jeffrey Klenzing1 1NASA/GSFC Heliophysics Science Division, Space Weather Laboratory, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland,USA (@; @.Scientific Basis of Nuclear Explosions.

12 CHAPTER II-Descriptions of Nuclear Explosions. 26 Introduction. 26 Description of Air and Surface Bursts. 27 Description of High-Altitude Bursts. 45 Description of Underwater Bursts. 48 Description of Underground Bursts. 58 Scientific Aspects of Nuclear Explosion Phenomena. 63 CHAPTER III-Air Blast.